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Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
was not so much about lgbt rights, though that was part of it. for me harvey milk was about civil rights and the rights of all people and the recognition that we as minimum bier of the lgbt community are connected to other communities, and that we cannot be for lgbt rights if we're also not for the rights of other groups. that we cannot be -- (applause) >> -- only about the lgbt community. that if you believe in gay rights and lgbt rights, that you necessarily have to be for the rights of immigrants. that you necessarily have to be for the rights of women. that you necessarily have to be for the right for anyone who is disinfranchised in society. that to me is the essence of that legacy. * and why it's a legacy that transcends, transcends the lgbt community in terms whatv harvey milk was about. so, as an openly gay latino man, i am grateful for that legacy. and i am grateful that harvey milk, that george moscone, have become a beacon of light and hope not only for the lgbt community, but for so many communities throughout this country. and not just this country, but the world. and, so, t
time in the most dramatic, possible way. we hear the confrontations of the civil rights movement and the life and death decisions being made during the cuban missile crisis. >> caroline kennedy on the 1962 recordings of the late president in the oval office. that this tonight as we continue through the holiday on c-span2. >> the west virginia state society honored senator robert byrd last month. the longest living senator in history, robert died in -- robert byrd died in 2010. we will hear from two of his staffers. >> the first speaker is ira shapiro. author of "the last great senate." he played important roles in foreign intelligence surveillance and the completing of the metrorail system. during the clinton administration, he served as a leading u.s. trader and earned the rank of staffman. -- ambassador. he was described as an antidote and he promised to deliver. he practiced international trade law and washington. on behalf of the west virginia state society, i would like to introduce ira shapiro. thank you. [applause] >> thank you for the kind introduction. thank you to the s
was going on. >> you know, one thing that really struck me was his involvement in the civil rights. i look at the country today. there's so many people that don't know the history, have no clue about the history of civil rights. and here is your father speaking very passionately about a young black student who had been admitted to the university of mississippi. they were protesting on the grounds. they do not want james meredith there. and your father was talking to the governor about that. >> we've got to get order up there and that's what we thought we were going to have. >> mr. president, please, why don't you give an order to remove him. >> how can i remove him, governor, when there's a riot in the street and he may step out of that building and something happen to him? i can't remove him under those conditions. let's get order, then we can do something about meredith. we've got to get somebody up there now to get order and stop the firing and the shooting. then you and i will talk on the phone about meredith. first we've got to get order. >> he's really mad. i kno
correctness or what. >> a sense of a person's civil rights. >> a lack of awareness. we're teaching men the way to
and development, transportation, and civil rights. he was later appointed special account told by janet reno -- special counsel by janet reno. he later represented the united states as u.s. ambassador to the united nations and served as a special envoy to sudan. he has been a great friend to missouri, st. louis, and washington university. please join me in welcoming him now. [applause] >> thank you. thank you very much. i owe our speaker an apology. when you hear the apology, you are going to conclude that i am a really terrible human being. i am the kind of person who takes advantage of a friend, especially a friend who is vulnerable. when he is vulnerable, i pounce. tonight's origin was a rehearsal dinner the night before the wedding of victoria will, george's only daughter. george was standing on the edge of the hotel ballroom taking and one of life's great moments. the marriage of the daughter is so deeply emotional. george the loving father was clearly caught up in a moment. that was the moment i seized the opportunity to strike. i sidled up to him and whispered ever so softly in his ea
will run at 186 miles per hour. >>> and civil rights icon nelson mandela has been discharged from a south africa hospital. 94-year-old former president will continue treatment at his home. he was hospitalized with a lung infection on december 8th. one week later, he had surgery to remove gallstones. i'm sure everyone's pleased to hear that he's doing well. >> thanks so much for that, lisa. >>> in the wake of the connecticut school shooting, the nr after the wants to put armed volunteers in every american school. the proposal facing heavy criticism. the man in charge is here to defend it. plus how the host of nbc's "meet the press" may have broken washington, d.c. gun laws. it's lots of things. all waking up. ♪ becoming part of the global phenomenon we call the internet of everything. ♪ trees will talk to networks will talk to scientists about climate change. cars will talk to road sensors will talk to stoplights about traffic efficiency. the ambulance will talk to patient records will talk to doctors about saving lives. it's going to be amazing. and exciting. and maybe, most remarkabl
, there are incredible civil rights conversations in this book that kind of take you through the most dramatic moments from the desegregation of ole miss and then birmingham and then kind of working with, figuring out the relationship with the leaders of the movement. and it's unbelieve -- you look back and you think some of this progress was inevitable, and this really shows you how incredibly difficult and tense it was. >> this is a breathtaking historical document. >> it really is. >> this is no one's interpretation of what happened 50 years ago. it's history as it happened. how did you get access to the tapes, first of all, and how do you whittle down a presidency to a few hours? >> well, the tapes have been opened over the years, with the last ones -- there's a few in this book that haven't been released before. but they've been available, but they're just -- they're raw data just like any research archive. and so we wanted to make them accessible in a way that people could digest it, that they could hear it. so we picked when we wanted to place it in context because it's the 50th anniversary, an
and christine gregoire from washington, why in. >> two governors leading an important new civil right struggle, the civil rights struggle of our generation, many feel as i do, and they helped spearhead the effort to gain marriage equality in their state, in washington state and maryland this year. they did it against the odds and knowing that there would be a referendum, a voter referendum if they pushed the legislatures into this and knowing also that marriage equality had never been approved in a voter referendum. they led that fight against the odds and as a result the citizens of their state are better off and have more fairness and more equality in their states this year. >> anna, you also chose a governor from your party as well, chris christie. >> dana, you know he was on the nice list when my democrat colleague and friend richard chose him on the nice list, too, so when richard and i are agreeing it tells you the man was nice. >> although i think chris christie could have been on my naughty list, too, ana. >> and i think he'd be happy with that, too. what chris christie did this year d
, an did. this is for the marriage and sanctity of the family. gregg: did you read the iowa civil rights act? >> probably some time in 1991 when i was preparing for the new york bar. gregg: if you bothered to read the law you would have noticed that all you have to do is prove that gender is a factor, one factor, that's all. joey? >> arthur loves when i say this so i'm going to say it, this is outrageous. this is a blow to family values everywhere. when they couched the decision, that is the court in terms of family values. what about the values of this woman? what about equality, what about decency. what about respecting women and not treating them as objects. this decision goes too far. but consider the source, gregg, it was a decision mailed pwaoeupb seven males, which speaks to the need of having diversity on that court. when we look at the court's decision if it were not for our agenda mr. aidala she would have not been terminated. >> this was a woman running a law practice and one of her men was interfering with her marriage she could fire him as well. >> note hat gregg: the iowa c
contributor and civil rights and law professor avery friedman. morning, avery. >> good morning, carol. >> i think the thing that stands out for most people is that this man was convicted of murder for killing his grandmother who was 92 years old. apparently he beat her to death and he was on parole. he only served 17 years. how is that possible? >> yeah, it seems impossible to happen. but if you study this, spengler was in his late 20s when he committed this murder. and one would expect that he would have spent the rest of his life in the new york penal system. the fact is, though, that he was paroled out and actually had an obligation to report to his parole officer until this happened. but the fact is that it struck me as virtually impossible for the parole department not to know that this guy was a problem. the fact that he committed this murder -- again, even though he was in his 20s, unless he was a model person in the penitentiary, it would seem pretty obvious that there was a problem with this guy and of course the worst happened here. and we will never know, although we do tend to t
is greater than the one who is in the world. and there's a wonderful spiritual that i was taught in the civil rights movement that sings friends don't treat me like they used to since i laid my burden down. and to lay down the burden of prejudice and narrow mindedness is a huge burden to lay down. and there will be a time when those friends you had as friends don't treat you like they used to. and just accessing what my friend leyla teaches me about god can consciousness. -- god consciousness. >> yeah. >> to access that. when this florida pastor wanted to burn the qurans, i said, i was in the gym on a bike, you know, doing my cardio, and i was reading this -- [laughter] and in "the new york times," and i said -- and it came to me we shouldn't be burning qurans, we should be reading qurans. so we put together this program of three of my closest muslim friends to come and talk about what the quran means to me. and leyla came and spoke, and i asked her why she does what he does, and she said, oh, it's to keep my godnessness alive. and i think -- god consciousness alive which you know will never
, whatever you want to call them and everyone complains we don't use the exact right term, you we you will a know what i'm talking about, where you can spray bullets and kill 20 people in a minute. this is not the way a civilized society should operate. >> funny you mention that because on friday, the n.r.a.'s wayne laperriere said exactly we need more gun training and more guards and all of these things. i guarantee he that part of the press conference and statement won't get covered at all. i think that the media do have an anti-gun agenda and doesn't follow policies at all and have it on their own and all other ways to deal with scoot shootings and mass violence will be sunk below the radar. >> and the run knives, why don't we outlaw lives and they don't do mass killings with knives. >> why not outlaw mental illness-- >> we know what the solutions are, we've discussed them for years. >> i don't know-- >> no, no, we can make it hard tower kill that many people in a minute. we can do that. as the president said and i think taking note of and worth covering, we can do better. >> i thi
years in which he can have his way over republicans who are right now in a civil war in the house. >> i mean, if that's the plan that it's working, because as charles mentioned chuckle head you have members of the g.o.p. calling other members of the g.o.p. chuckle heads, the 40 or 50 tea party members for not doing anything so there is a civil war. >> the idea that the president was trying to foment civil war in the g.o.p. maybe that's what happened. i don't know if he was a diabolical genius and know that he is creating that. >> the president knew if he does nothing that it's on them, the house controls the purse strings and if he does nothing, these things are going to go into place anyway. >> i have always disagreed with the notion that the country will blame republicans. they might in the short-term in the six to eight months to follow but your legacy will be one of two recessions in both terms, mr. president. so, yeah. go ahead and say they will blame republicans. it's going to be on your presidency. back in recession. >> send us your comments on all of this, please. we have to tel
. and mostly after you passed your exams you would progress through the civil service. a very few got through the exams and said "i'm gonna drop out. "i don't want to be an administrator. "i want to go out into the landscape and right poetry. i want to paint paintings." and these were the literati, and this is the sort of thing that they did. and what's fascinating about this is we've got here, effectively, the table on which you did your scrolls. i've never noticed that. now, here we have a painting of-- i don't know whether he's-- he may be a grandfather, he may be a particular member of the literati. one can't be sure. the boys are bringing him refreshments. have you seen this? i've noticed that, yes. do you know what it is? it could be a bird or a bat or something. it's a bat! it is a bat? yeah. this boy's pointing at it because a bat in chinese is fu and fu is a homophone for "happiness." oh, right. and a red bat... ...is double happiness. oh, okay, yeah. isn't that wonderful? i mean, just a tiny little thing, and it just works. and it just gives the pi
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)